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Author Topic: revision strategies  (Read 6267 times)

Jamen

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revision strategies
« on: November 09, 2014, 02:41:57 PM »
I have tried to expand my horizons over the previous two weeks to take a stab at picking up some revisions from previous writers. We all know that these "new writer" revision request vary from unwarranted to very reasonable. My historic policy was to not touch this type of order with a 10-foot pole. I did this based on my assumed risk assumptions; however, this historic policy of mine was based largely on assumptions because I basically refused to take the risk.

Anyway, I decided to select some new-writer-revisions to see if this kind of order would work out. I ended up selecting several of these orders in a few days and 2 have wound up in dispute. I will say that the 2 going into dispute were picked up from already disgruntled customers and that was probably a mistake on my part. I know better than to assume that risk. It seems that even following the request of a mad customer is a fruitless endeavor. I do have a very positive dispute record so the outcome may be favorable. I can say that 2 of the orders received very positive feedback, but the overall risk assumed from picking up these orders seems volatile at best, at least in my experience so far. The final judgment will have to be how the disputes get resolved. At the end of the day my strategy will be selecting those orders that maximize my investment in time and energy.

I'm in the middle of a research project to determine if secondary revisions should be included in my strategy.   I'm interested to hear from the other writers about their experience in the secondary writer market.

Is your experience favorable? Is it too risky?

Also, my rating has consistently remained in the upper 80% to mid 90% for several months now so I think my overall performance is good.   

genus

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Re: revision strategies
« Reply #1 on: November 09, 2014, 05:52:14 PM »
I made reference to the same issue some time back. I stated that from experience,  most of the revision orders are from disgruntled clients. There is thus a higher risk of having a revision order going to dispute status compared to orders that a writer has written from scratch.
« Last Edit: November 11, 2014, 07:47:46 PM by genus »

Scriptitator

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Re: revision strategies
« Reply #2 on: November 11, 2014, 02:15:57 PM »
Revision orders /can/ be easy money, but I generally ignore then outright unless there are consistently slim pickings and I need to be working. I generally assume that revision=rewrite unless close examination reveals precisely what needs to be changed.

You're right about the 'disgruntled customers' thing; sometimes they're disgruntled because the previous writer sent them incoherent or obvi ESL, paraphrased plagiarisms of hardly relevant papers. Other times the customer is what we call in the US a 'lemon'--spoiled goods from get-go. Right now, in fact, I have an order still in my Current Orders which was a revision order I picked up like six weeks ago. Needless to say, what was supposed to be a 1-page addition to a 15-page research paper (DNA as a model for data storage) has turned into a never-ending saga, as if UVOCorp is a fast food joint that the customer thinks gives free refills if you show up each day with the same plastic cup.

But yeah, be wary of these orders.

Bob

Jamen

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Re: revision strategies
« Reply #3 on: November 11, 2014, 03:12:47 PM »
Script, thanks for your shared insights. I have also picked up some revisions that say something like "perfect paper thanks, but please check the sources and apa format." Yeah, easy enough. Then it comes back 7 days later and it has been crucified by, not a professor, but an up-and-comer "mentor" that uses non-industrial academic phrases like, "please spend more time analyzing the echoes from the balance sheet."


yat2015

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Re: revision strategies
« Reply #4 on: November 11, 2014, 03:19:54 PM »
I recently picked a revision order which required a very simple editing (i.e splitting the last paragraph into short sentences because the entire paragraph consisted of one sentence). I revised the essay but it was set on dispute immediately I uploaded it. My average rating also dropped significantly due to that dispute.


Pett

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Re: revision strategies
« Reply #5 on: November 12, 2014, 01:35:00 PM »
Revision orders may be a risky time investment but one in a while they offer huge payoffs. During the recent low season, I remember earning $210 from one order by simply changing a single source that did not match the theme of the paper. The customer went on to become one of my return customers which was an added bonus. On the flip side, most revision customers are generally indignant and potentially malevolent especially when they are convinced the quality of the order will not improve, and end up completing the paper by themselves.  This is particularly true for papers with multiple grammatical errors and blatant academic violations where the customer's only logical recourse is to request for another writer and/or complete the paper on their own then later request for a refund despite your best efforts to revise the paper (which some times involves editing the entire paper).


From personal experience, revision orders can be unforgiving black holes that gradually deplete your rating, and while I do not mind working on them, I have over time set up measures to qualify giving such orders my time of day and make them less of a gamble.

1. Revision instructions: They should be simple and straightforward. I generally ignore orders with convoluted or ambiguous instructions. Revision instructions with poor grammar are also a definite No No.

2. The paper to be revised: The paper should have some sort of coherence and grammatical integrity otherwise it has a high potential for dispute. Ignore poorly written papers. They are an exceptionally huge pain and require copious amounts of corrections for both grammar and continuity which is akin to writing them from scratch.

3. You should be comfortable with the price and deadline.

4. Communicate with the customer: Before commencing the revision, decorum dictates introducing yourself as the new writer, then confirming and reconfirming the revision requirements with the customer. I have found a number of customers actually reassign writers from orders due to poor communication. Communication helps in developing rapport and a revision strategy that the both of you agree on. Customers who agree with you at the beginning of the revision and collaborate with you during the revision process feel equally responsible for your output and tend to accept the revisions. The notes between the both of you can also be used as evidence in case the order is placed on dispute. Communication further demonstrates a level of commitment and diligence that pacifies the customer's residual hostility with the previous writer.

5. Time: If possible, deliver the revised paper way ahead of the deadline. This gives the customer time to review the revisions and also affords you time to address potential future revisions.  Remember most revision orders are time sensitive due to time loss with the previous writer so expedient revisions increase the chances of the order being accepted.

In case the order still winds up in dispute status, the above steps will definitely give you an edge. I cannot stress enough the importance of communicating with the customer. Your initial discourse and consensus will set precedence on how you complete the revisions so in case a cheeky customer attempts to insert new revision instructions in subsequent revision requests, you will already have sufficient proof to justify a reject response and a sturdy background to orient a dispute in your favor.
Join the company of lions rather than assume the lead among foxes. ~ The Talmud

Jamen

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Re: revision strategies
« Reply #6 on: November 12, 2014, 02:23:03 PM »
Pett, thanks...very nicely put. I particularly like how you stress the importance of communication. I often cut corners here because the communication system is more like the Pony Express instead of instant emailing. My personality likes to knock orders out asap and it is difficult for me to wait for a customer that may never respond as the deadline ticks away... So, I may have to reconsider my strategy there.

I will delay a submission for a quick-turnaround revision at times. Some revisions may only take 5 minutes, but I am mindful about the customer and their belief that revisions should take several hours to be adequate. This seems to meet their psychological needs.

Pett

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Re: revision strategies
« Reply #7 on: November 12, 2014, 03:44:13 PM »
Glad I could help Jamen. I have worked on several reversions and 85-90% have resulted in positive outcomes.

My personality likes to knock orders out asap and it is difficult for me to wait for a customer that may never respond as the deadline ticks away... So, I may have to reconsider my strategy there.

This is one of the cool things about UVO. In cases where the customer fails to respond on time, you can always message the support team and they usually follow up with the customer for a response and/or extend the deadline. Besides, if you are fined for lateness and you were validly waiting for the customer's response, the fine is normally lifted and your rating restored.

Some revisions may only take 5 minutes, but I am mindful about the customer and their belief that revisions should take several hours to be adequate. This seems to meet their psychological needs.

Communication will give you an upper hand here. Once you fully establish the revision parameters with the customer, you put their mind at ease and invalidate their cognitive biases. Its easy pickings from there; they literally pay you to simply punctuate some of these revision orders. Earning the the trust and loyalty of a potential return customer doesn't hurt either.
Join the company of lions rather than assume the lead among foxes. ~ The Talmud

Jamen

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Re: revision strategies
« Reply #8 on: November 12, 2014, 04:11:32 PM »
I have to agree. Communication would have to be the best approach regardless of all other variables. The other consideration is that the customer will automatically begin judging the communication and then make assumptions on how the final product will turn out. Simply put, a few carefully crafted sentences can be an extreme advantage in the revision process. 

Scriptitator

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Re: revision strategies
« Reply #9 on: September 11, 2015, 08:00:20 AM »
Ditto on "communications with customer meets their psyc needs".  I agree, also, that ~90% of the time communication is wholly unnecessary.  Thus, I think it's good to often send a preliminary "Hello! I'll be working on your order today, so..." even though you don't require or expect a response.

"Then it comes back 7 days later and it has been crucified by, not a professor, but an up-and-comer "mentor" that uses non-industrial academic phrases like..."

Well said.  I actually dug this thread up just to vent a little.  It's the worst feeling ever when your customer hits you with a chaotic jumble of complaints, often of the vague, hand-waving variety, and you just KNOW that their English proficiency, as well as their comprehension of the course materials, is such that they are utterly clueless and, in a panic, showed the paper you wrote to either their prof or a classmate.  In the two minutse the prof/classmate glance at the paper, they mumble some things.  Then you get a frantic and confused revision request.

Reminds me of a physics lab I had in college.  My partner was obviously 110% clueless, but carried himself in this really pompous, dignified (read: insecure) fashion.  It was a refreshingly easy lab, and I knew exactly what I was doing.  Nevertheless, the partner would take his paper (after copying down what I did) to seemingly every other student as well as the prof to make sure that <strike>I</strike> he was doing it right.  It was extremely frustrating, although for political reasons I couldn't really say confront him or the prof about it.

But yeah, nominal preliminary communications with the customer are key.  In fact, now that I think about it, it would be nice if we, the writers, would be clued in on the customer's a) English proficiency and b) their comprehension of the course material. This would be valuable info to have.