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Author Topic: Plagiarism consequences  (Read 17222 times)

michael

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Re: Plagiarism consequences
« Reply #15 on: March 23, 2011, 01:06:04 PM »
...as a large, segmented order writer, I often revise/tweak/edit/polish several times before both the customer and I are satisfied. My first file is always original writing and, since the company stores all papers as they are sent, my work gets hit with plagiarism fines/messages/delays that require I take precious time to call and correct the issue...
System is not perfect. At the moment we have to go with what we have. We gradually improve it.
If you have constructive suggestions we are eager to listen to you.
Send an email to writers.department@academicexperts.us , mark the topic "for Michael".
« Last Edit: March 23, 2011, 01:15:15 PM by michael »

michael

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Re: Plagiarism consequences
« Reply #16 on: March 23, 2011, 01:22:08 PM »
... I seek for lenience by management against such vice, perhaps give a writer 2 warnings, followed by a fortnight suspension, a responsible writer will have time to review his/her writing skills, and also realize that greed for higher pay has its consequences. Thank you.
We do like that. If the plagiarism was partial (less than 20%) we often suspend a writer, write a note with a warning, fine, demote etc. But if we find a paper completely copy-pasted from another source, or a paper completely paraphrased with fake sources awkwardly inserted ...
Remember that a single plagiarized paper may lead to someone getting kicked from college. The losses a plagiarizer causes and bares just cannot be compared.

michael

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Re: Plagiarism consequences
« Reply #17 on: March 23, 2011, 01:26:23 PM »
From my two years experience and only with about two plagiarism issues for the entire period and one of which was part of the clients material, I have come to the conclusion that it possible to avoid plagiarism if one is keen enough to follow the basics.

Exactly. If you write from your own, if you write "from your head" after reading the sources, you will rarely find yourself plagiarizing. Basically, you should be fare. If you write (not paraphrase) you won't plagiarize.

michael

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Re: Plagiarism consequences
« Reply #18 on: March 23, 2011, 01:31:59 PM »
Is paraphrasing not a way of avoiding plagiarism? ...
It is different. You need to define exactly what do you mean by paraphrasing. In one case, you may paraphrase a line or two, or you may even paraphrase several sentences and reference them. In another case, you paraphrase the whole article. What is the point of your writing then?
Paraphrasing a thought is acceptable. Paraphrasing the whole paragraph (or an essay) is not.
Also, in most cases we find writers paraphrasing one source (like wikipedia). Then they provide irrelevant references to make the entire writing look more academic. This is just ridiculous. Such writers are fired immediately.
« Last Edit: March 23, 2011, 01:33:50 PM by michael »

michael

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Re: Plagiarism consequences
« Reply #19 on: March 23, 2011, 01:37:36 PM »
...Some facts and findings cannot be altered and paraphrasing is the only way to ensure originality, though with appropriate referencing.
Indeed. Keywords are "Some facts and findings" and "with appropriate referencing".
Of course you cannot write something that was never written. You can only conduct a secondary research using other people' findings. But you need to distinguish between paraphrasing and plagiarizing. Even with references, a paper with low originality rate will count as plagiarized.

michael

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Re: Plagiarism consequences
« Reply #20 on: March 23, 2011, 03:16:01 PM »
Look.... you should understand how to structure your paper, it will allow you to avoid plagiarism. Lets take a simple paper with concise and clear-cut structure:
1st - you read up on the topic;
2nd - you make introduction and include all the thoughts and opinions you are going to defend in your paper;
3rd - you take 1 thought or opinion for each body paragraph. You start every body paragraph with a statement. Then you provide a citation or a summary from a source you took, you reference it correctly. Finally, you summarize your body paragraph in its last conclusive sentence.
4th - you make a conclusion where you summarize your statements (do not just copy-paste your points from previous writing).
There you go, an original paper with references, citations and correctly sited sources.

This is a simple, primitive example, but your writings should basically follow this pattern. Of course it may be different in statistical papers, thesis writings etc. But general character of this work is like that.
But of course, if you take wikipedia article, paraphrase it, then pour some water and make up sources.. sayonara.

muhafidh19

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Re: Plagiarism consequences
« Reply #21 on: March 23, 2011, 09:33:16 PM »
So far, I've done a few progressive-schedule papers, wherein I have submitted the entire previous segment with each new one. For example, in a 30-30-30 order, I've submitted 30, then 60, then 90. I do this because I want to review and improve the prior segment each time, which alters the pagination.

So far, doing this has not resulted in any accidental findings of plagiarism due to the repetition of the prior segments. However, if others have had prior segments caught inadvertently as ostensible plagiarism in these progressive schedules, then I don't know what to think.

My guess is that new work done on the same order shouldn't result in inadvertent plagiarism. However, I think I've seen this: Sometimes a previous customer gets a new order number while asking for a revision. I don't know if those instances are accidents or actions of administrative convenience (e.g., to clear up a long message history), but it seems possible that adding content to old work under a new order number could look like plagiarism. If this is fairly well under control, then I have no concerns.

michael

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Re: Plagiarism consequences
« Reply #22 on: March 24, 2011, 06:39:36 AM »
... new work done on the same order shouldn't result in inadvertent plagiarism. However, I think I've seen this: Sometimes a previous customer gets a new order number while asking for a revision. I don't know if those instances are accidents or actions of administrative convenience (e.g., to clear up a long message history), but it seems possible that adding content to old work under a new order number could look like plagiarism. If this is fairly well under control, then I have no concerns.
Didn't quite get what you mean.

teni

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Re: Plagiarism consequences
« Reply #23 on: March 26, 2011, 05:49:46 PM »
I beg to correct something. some plagiarism cases are not fair especially literature essays. you find an order returned for revision yet the highlighted plagiarized cases are quotes put in quotations and citation given at the end of the quote. kindly let the support team evaluate the plagiarism before fining us.
boom

classact

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Re: Plagiarism consequences
« Reply #24 on: March 27, 2011, 01:18:01 PM »
I think it is critical to examine all cases. I have had work returned for plagiarism but the highlighted sections were questions and answers that were designed to come from a text. I had the fine removed but it is still unfortunate to be tagged for plagiarism

michael

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Re: Plagiarism consequences
« Reply #25 on: March 28, 2011, 10:30:41 AM »
Some orders are plag-checked or approved automatically. In other cases there is a human factor.. a supporter him/herself may not always be sure what to consider as plagiarism. As you know, sometimes you have to use customers' own materials etc. Majority of fines for plagiarism are automatic as well.
In any case you should communicate with the support about this. If you are getting fined inadequately, or the support team is reluctant to remove your fine which you consider unfair you can contact writers department (check contacts at the forum home page).

Billymw

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Re: Plagiarism consequences
« Reply #26 on: March 29, 2011, 08:36:06 AM »

I like this topic on Plagiarism because it concerns all professional writers. Initially, I was greatly  affected with plag papers but not anymore. somehow I know when my work is plag or not depending on my own cognition against the original sources -  even before I subject it for plag-detection. At all cost avoid primitive paraphrasing , use your own words and consider it each order on its own right.
otherwise I believe true palg-free papers is virtually impossible but we try to be original and creative guys...sayonara

classact

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Re: Plagiarism consequences
« Reply #27 on: April 04, 2011, 07:39:44 PM »
When you are producing a lot of orders along a similar line it is important to be careful of self plagiarism. At times prior essays may come to mind and you may unwittingly reproduce work you have done before. Freshness is the antidote here.